Archive for April, 2016

You Can Make A Difference

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Great Give Logo 2016 copy copy
How to donate

May 3rd is only a few days away and such an important day it is. CAEF is part of the Kitsap Great Give, a part of the National Day of Giving. It is really exciting as the sponsors have a pool of money where they will proportionally match any donation. Which means your donation is even larger,

Please join us as a partner and help meet our goals. We want to early diagnois Charcot Foot so an amputation won’t happen. Curriculum is currently being developed that will be used to educate the public, the patient at risk, the medical profession and anyone who works with people at risk.

Because of your donation last year, The Charcot Foot Deformity Fact Sheet on peripheral neuropathy was developed, now, highly regarded by the medical profession and informative for the public. Presentations were given to diabetic groups and took part in other events. Max and I are members of the local hospitals Patient Experience Council a part of the CHI Franciscan Health.

A local foundation once said they were looking for a “Helping hand and not a Handout.” We need your “Helping Hand”, and/or your expertise. Please join us in our mission to help people with peripheral neuropathy avoid Charcot Foot and amputation.

Thank you for your donation and helping to avoid amputation.

This weeks article was contributed by Founder Annita Shaw
Brought to you by Charcot Awareness Education Foundation

Charcot Future Plans/Projects

Charcot Future Plans/Projects 4/21/2016

Time is really moving quickly. May 3 is only a few days away and such an important day it is for us. We are part of the Kitsap Great Give which is part of the national day of giving. It is really exciting as the sponsors have a pool of money that they will proportionally match any donation. Which means your donation will give more money to work with.

Please join as a partner and help meet our goals. We want to diagnois Charcot Foot in patients early so they won’t have an amputation. This means creating curriculum that can be used to educate the public, the patient at risk, the medical profession and anyone who might work with people at risk. We are presently developing the public, patient at risk part on curriculum.

Since I have Charcot and my foot was rebuilt to avoid an amputation, I have a documented procedure I would like to put in print for anyone to read…My Story in other words. But I have several other’s stories including one of my Board members who is a Charcot Amputee that I want to include in this publication. We are looking for a publisher as I write this.

Because of your donations last year, we were able to create a hand out on peripheral neuropathy that was highly regarded by the medical profession and informative for the public. We were able to reach out to more people through our activities and presentations at meetings with diabetic groups. Max an I are now part of the local hospitals Patient Experience Council which is part of the Franciscan Hospitals and CHI.

I really liked what one of our local foundations said at our last foundation meeting, that they were looking for a “Helping hand and not a Handout.” That’s what we need. We need your “Helping Hand”, and/or your expertise.

Please join us in our mission to help people with peripheral neuropathy avoid amputation.
National Day of Giving
How to donate

This weeks article was contributed by Founder Annita Shaw
Brought to you by Charcot Awareness Education Foundation

Charcot Awareness & Great Give May 3

Top of Post Gr Give
Card Front
Fact Sheet inside front
How to donate2016 Sponsors

This weeks article was contributed by Founder Annita Shaw
Brought to you by Charcot Awareness Education Foundation

Would an Early A1c Test Lessen Complications?

As a diabetic, I had my usual doctors appointment recently. This was to review my blood glucose level over the last three months since my major fall in August. I was to have a blood draw last week, but when I went for it “they” did not include my A1c test. The lab tech took extra blood and said she would call up to see if they wanted the test run.

Well, who ever she talked with said it wasn’t needed. The doctor wanted one anyway. I then said I was not going down to the lab to have another stick. He said it wouldn’t be necessary. They would just do a finger stick and have the results back in about 2 minutes. I had heard this some time back, but not from the doctor so had let the statement slide.

After the stick and on my way to make my next appointment, I began to think about the Charcot Foundation, the many people with diabetes and pre diabetes and all those that have it, but don’t know. (I really believe I was one of those for a long time even though I went in for regular check ups. They didn’t include anything about diabetes.)

My question was, “If we really want to diagnose diabetes, a simple finger sick in a lab can give a picture in a matter of 2+ minutes about your blood glucose level over the past 3 months that could save many from the secondary effects, such as blindness, foot deformity and amputation and maybe even many heart problems.” So why isn’t it done? Especially as part of a blood draw, or the simple finger stick?

Since the person doing the finger stick wasn’t terribly busy I asked her why it wasn’t done to diagnose a diabetic or a part of the routine blood work of a diabetic, or others coming in for a blood draw? She thought about it for a few minutes then said it sounded like a very good idea followed by, but the insurance company wouldn’t pay for it, if they hadn’t already been diagnosed with diabetes.

Hum…

In early 1995, I was at my dad’s doctor’s appointment waiting for him when the nurse, also my nurse, asked me how I was doing. I said that I had been drinking a lot of fluid and peeing a lot. She reached under the counter pulled out a little specimen bottle and said, “Go pee in it.” I did, and a couple days later she called me and scheduled an appointment saying I had diabetes and need to see the doctor.

So what has changed? Why is the finger stick not a common technique used to diagnose something (diabetes) that the media has informed us is an real problem in the USA. Who is the decision maker? Is it an economic decision? money problem? Who is in charge? The medical profession? The insurance industry? The government?Pharmaceuticals ? ? ?

This weeks article was contributed by Founder Annita Shaw
Brought to you by Charcot Awareness Education Foundation