Archive for December, 2016

Give Of Your Time, Talent and Treasure

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I want to send our Best Wishes to all of you who read and support our Charcot Awareness Education Foundation, It is so exciting to know we have friends around the world. We hope those of you who are experiencing foot pain or are going through foot surgery find the awesome doctor and an answer to your problem.

Also take time to reach out to someone you haven’t touched base with in many many years, or someone who is alone much of the time. Your smile, presence and warmth will make a difference in their life.

A friend of mine who has worked with nonprofit organizations for years often says those who support foundations give of their time talent and treasure. This past year I really began to see this happening in our Charcot Foundation. It takes a lot of volunteer work, as many long hours were put in on the Mardi Gras float which brought in about $1500. This sparked us enough to work on the Great Give which brought in double what we got the year before.

This allowed us to purchase the Charcot Foundation’s own computer and printer. They have made life easier.

We were again selected to take part in the Mardi Gras nonprofit miniature float competition in February of 2017. Not far away. We are excited about an upcoming Charcot flier, curriculum development and some stories of Charcot patients to be published.

Thanks to our awesome donors making this possible. Please join us as a partner. Tell us your story if you are a care giver of a Charcot patient , or are a Charcot patient, or you just want to help the Charcot foundation make a difference in someone’s life.

Make a difference in 2017. May it be your most rewarding ever.

Happy New Year!

Please donate to help inform the public about the damage Charcot Bone Deterioration disease causes. Please send your donations to:
Charcot Awareness Education Foundation
P. O. Box 3902
Silverdale, WA 98383-3902
We are an approved IRS 501(c)(3) nonprofit foundation and an approved Washington State Charities Program

Message by the Founder Annita Shaw

Brought toby Charcot Awareness Education Foundation

Give Of Your Time, Talent, and Treasure

img_7558I want to send our Best Wishes to all of you who read and support our Charcot Awareness Education Foundation, It is so exciting to know we have friends around the world. We hope those of you who are experiencing foot pain or are going through foot surgery find the awesome doctor and answer to your problem.

Also take time to reach out to someone you haven’t touched base with in many many years, or someone who is alone much of the time. Your smile, presence and warmth will make a difference in their life.

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays!

Please donate to help inform the public about the damage this disease causes. Funding can be sent to:
Charcot Awareness Education Foundation
P. O. Box 3902
Silverdale, WA 98383-3902
We are an approved IRS 501(c)(3) nonprofit foundation and an approved
Washington State Charities Program

Message by the Founder Annita Shaw

Brought toby Charcot Awareness Education Foundation

What Makes A Perfect Gift?

MAMC Christmas Tree

MAMC Christmas Tree

This is the time of year many people around the world celebrate religious events. Now, a time to reflect on the past year and give thanks for the blessings that have come along. A time to thank a higher power for guidance and assistance to achieve. If you have followed Bonnie and my stories over the past years, I’m sure you have noticed we are both very thankful for the blessings we have been given as people with Charcot Foot.

I was raised on a farm in western Nebraska by Christian parents, quite poor by today’s standards. I had no idea we were poor. It wasn’t an issue. We merely did with what we had and no one felt sorry for anyone. In fact, they helped each other.

My mom made many of my clothes. We didn’t go hungry as we raised our own cattle, hogs and chickens and a large vegetable garden. She sold tomatoes, cabbage and lots of sweet corn. She saved this money for things we needed during winter and spring. Mom canned most of our food until the home freezer came to be. We did freeze beef, pork, chicken and corn, but that was kept at our local turkey processing plant that had wire cage storage boxes that people could rent to store their frozen food. That meant driving several miles to get it. Our refrigerator was an Ice box. Men in the area would cut ice on the river in the winter and store it in an ice house near the river. Those that helped harvest the ice could get the ice at the ice house to put in their ice box when they needed it.

I was just big enough to look over the edge of a table when my parents had butchered a hog. The meat was on a large table in our basement and my parents were wrapping the meat to take to the turkey plant to freeze. It was near Christmas and I was so excited every time I saw a present. I was told we didn’t have money to buy gifts for everyone, sooo… As I came down the long stairs to the basement, I saw all those packages. I wanted to give one of them to an elderly couple I had adopted as my grandma and grandpa. My parents tried to discourage me as they told me the package I had picked out had pork chops in it and it wouldn’t make a very good gift. Apparently I liked pork chops and wouldn’t agree. They finally gave in. We got into the car and drove to their home. I presented them with my gift. They were thrilled. However, I didn’t learn until later that was the first meat they had eaten in weeks. They had canned dandelion greens from their yard and were living primarily on that. Need I say when the word got out, the neighbors and friends saw to it that they were fine from then on.

As I look at our world at this time, I really wonder what has happened. Who or what has gotten in the way? I look at all the rules and regulations that have come about to “help or protect” us from ourselves. I wonder if the “Greatest good for the Greatest Number was really the answer to many probems. People afraid to say something for fear it will offend, or it will be taken “wrong”. Where is the trust and the true helping hand?

My dad told me a story about the time I was going out on my own to find a place to live. He told of a man searching for a place to relocate his family. He stopped a man on the street and asked, “What type of town is this? The man said, “What kind of a town did you come from?” The man replied, “The people were terrible. They were greedy, mean and unfriendly. The man then said, “That’s what they are like here too.” The man moved on. Soon another man came to the town looking for a place to move his family. He happened upon the same man on the street and asked, “What kind of a town is this?” Again the other man asked, “What type of town did you come from?” His reply. “Oh, the people were kind, helpful loving people.” The man said, “That’s the type of people you will find here.”

You make the difference! And the only way I can say it, as a Christian, is “Merry Christmas and a Prosperous New Year” to each of you.

Please donate to help inform the public about the damage this disease causes. Funding can be sent to:
Charcot Awareness Education Foundation
P. O. Box 3902
Silverdale, WA 98383-3902
We are an approved IRS 501(c)(3) nonprofit foundation and an approved
Washington State Charities Program

Message by the Founder Annita Shaw

Brought toby Charcot Awareness Education Foundation

Observe, Understand, Be Proactive

A friend of mine said she didn’t understand how her sister ended up with bloody blisters on her feet and didn’t feel them. Have you ever had the doctor check the sensation of your feet with a small monofilament line? Did he explain the test, or results, or the reason for the test? Mine may have, but it didn’t mean anything to me. I left feeling that everything was normal. It wasn’t. Like many with Neuropathy you don’t feel the pain, temperature (sensation) or trauma. So you really need to be proactive with your foot care.

The bloody blister thing happened to me. I didn’t feel anything either. We were in Vegas. It was incredibly hot. I was wearing socks in sandals. We decided to walk to he Mall and back to the RV. When I stepped up in to the RV, I looked down at my foot. It was bloody, so was the other one. Once inside, my husband helped me remove the sandal and socks to reveal bloody blisters. We carefully bathed and cleaned them. Did I go the doctor? No. Instead, we relied on some home remedies our parents used on us as kids and continued our trip. Healing went fine. Later upon reflection and after I was diagnosed with diabetes, I realized that this was a sign. I just didn’t know what it meant.

Keep your feet healthy. That means you do need to check your feet daily. Pay attention to the fact you may have stepped on something and check. Keep them clean and free from ulcers, calluses and infection. If you need medication to control blood sugar, or other conditions, take it correctly. Get regular check ups so your healing is at its maximum. If you have Charcot Foot, having a healthy foot is extremely important because that means you will be able to keep the foot and not likely have it amputated. It may mean orthotics, custom shoes, other type of bracing, but you will be able to walk.

Seek out a support group if you have diabetes, or look for others who may have Charcot. Keep in contact with them by phone, or meet with the organized group, or meet once a month for lunch, or breakfast as a social, or share happenings in your life. You could even see a movie together, go the local theatre for a play, concert, or musical. Stay active. Share your experiences, whether travels, things you’ve read, or your Charcot situation. Education helps one learn. This will improve your life, as well as, that of others. I have found seven people here in our small community that have Charcot just through observation and asking a few non-evasive questions. Don’t be a hermit, or shy, or be in denial. Talk to them show you are interested.

Even if walking is limited, you can maintain your independence and quality of life. Remember your feet are your foundation.

Please donate to help inform the public about the damage this disease causes. Funding can be sent to:
Charcot Awareness Education Foundation
P. O. Box 3902
Silverdale, WA 98383-3902
We are an approved IRS 501(c)(3) nonprofit foundation and an approved
Washington State Charities Program

Message by the Founder Annita Shaw

Brought toby Charcot Awareness Education Foundation

Charcot Symptoms (a Classification)

Often a person finds out they have Charcot Foot before they even know what the symptoms are. Unfortunately, in Bonnie’s case, she threw the covers back one morning and discovered blood all over the bed. A bone had gone through the bottom of her left foot. It was too late for her medical professionals to save her foot from amputation even though she had continually complained about her feet hurting her.
Even though you may have realized one foot was warmer than the other and that your foot was changing shape, maybe a bulge on the side, or the arch had fallen and the toes were now becoming hammer toes and you’ve had an x-ray. You may have been told you had arthritis. You most likely have had a trauma to the foot. If you have Neuropathy, you have a loss of sensation. Ask your doctor about Charcot.

This joint destruction process has a classification scheme of its order created by Eichenholtz decades ago called the Eichenholtz Classification.

Stage 0 – Clinically, there is joint edema, but radiographs (X-rays) are negative.

Stage 1 – Development stage (acute)

  • soft tissue edema (swelling, fluid in cells)
  • joint fragmentation
  • dislocation

Stage 2 – Coalescent ( merging ) phase

  • edema reduction
  • bone callus proliferation (growth)
  • fracture consolidation

Stage 3 – Reconstruction phase

  • osseous ankylosis (bony joint stiffening)
  • hypertrophic proliferation (abnormal enlargement of growth)

Charcot Foot (joint or bone) is serious for if this pathological process goes unchecked, it could result in joint deformity, ulceration, maybe infection and loss of function. The worst thing that could happen is amputation. Taking care of the feet and having a Charcot knowledgeable professional working with you will help stop further joint destruction.

If you have been told you have neuropathy. What type? Sensory-motor neuropathy? This is a loss of protective sensation, muscle weakness and also in the ankle. Autonomic neuropathy? Loss of vasomotor control, hyperemia and more.

Trauma can be another factor. They believe my being thrown from a horse when I was 10 led to my Charcot. Once I became a diabetic it became worse. Surgery and an incredible caring Surgeon saved my foot from amputation though it was nearly too late.

Early immobilization and staying off your feet are critical in the initial treatment of Charcot’s osteoathropathy. Take care of your feet. They are your foundation.

Please donate to help inform the public about the damage this disease causes. Funding can be sent to:
Charcot Awareness Education Foundation
P. O. Box 3902
Silverdale, WA 98383-3902
We are an approved IRS 501(c)(3) nonprofit foundation and approved
Washington State Charities Program

Message by the Founder Annita Shaw

Brought toby Charcot Awareness Education Foundation

What is Charcot?

charcot footCharcot foot (neuropathic osteoarthropathy) deformity is a serious progressive and disfiguring condition often unrecognized because of loss of sensation. The area of the foot most commonly affected is the mid arch. It can also develop in the rearfoot and ankle.

Neuropathy often masks damage and pain from a trauma to the foot as one lacks feeling or sensation. This makes a diagnosis difficult. The trauma, however, could happen years before any sign of Charcot is present. It could be as severe as fractures in the foot from a fall to a seemingly minor incident as a can falling out of the cabinet hitting the foot, or walking, or jogging.

The end results are:

  • a severely deformed and disabling foot that is difficult to shoe and brace properly.
  • recurrent infections and ulcerations.
  • amputation
  • amputation

    Goni's right foot

    Goni’s right foot

    Charcot Joint was discovered in syphilis patients in 1868 by Jean-Martin Charcot in France. Charcot and Charles Féré published the first scientific investigation of this condition in 1883. It wasn’t discovered in the diabetic patient until W. R. Jordan made the link in 1936. It is believed Charcot was not discovered earlier because diabetic patients didn’t live long enough. Some 24 diseases causes Charcot Foot to emerge.

    Message by the Founder Annita Shaw

    Brought toby Charcot Awareness Education Foundation

What is Charcot?

charcot footCharcot foot (neuropathic osteoarthropathy) deformity is a serious progressive and disfiguring condition often unrecognized because of loss of sensation. The area of the foot most commonly affected is the mid arch. It can also develop in the rearfoot and ankle.

Neuropathy often masks damage and pain from a trauma to the foot as one lacks feeling or sensation, neuropathy. This makes a diagnosis difficult. The trauma, however, could happen years before any sign of Charcot is present. It could be as severe as fractures in the foot from a fall to a seemingly minor incident as a can falling out of the cabinet hitting the foot, or walking, or jogging.

The end results are:

  • a severely deformed and disabling foot that is difficult to shoe and brace properly.
  • recurrent infections and ulcerations.
  • amputation
  • Boni's feet

    Boni’s feet

Boni's feet

Boni’s feet

Charcot Joint was discovered in syphilis patients in 1868 by Jean-Martin Charcot in France. Charcot and Charles Féré published the first scientific investigation of this condition in 1883. It wasn’t discovered in the diabetic patient until W. R. Jordan made the link in 1936. It is believed Charcot was not discovered earlier because diabetic patients didn’t live long enough. Some 2, or more, diseases causes Charcot Foot to emerge.
before-amputation
before-amputation

Message by the Founder Annita Shaw

Brought toby Charcot Awareness Education Foundation